Why Does my GFCI Outlet Keep Tripping?

It’s not uncommon for Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) outlets to trip, especially during these rainy Northern Arizona monsoon summers. When they do trip they’re trying to alert you to a problem.

It makes sense for the GFCI to trip when there is a problem, but what causes them to keep tripping? What should you do if your GFCI outlet keeps tripping? How do you know what the problem is?

In this article, we’ll look at the most common causes for GCFI outlets to keep tripping and how to solve them.

Note – always be careful when working with electrical outlets. Shock may occur and it can do serious harm. If you don’t have experience with electrical outlets it’s best to hire a professional.

What is a GFCI Outlet?

GFCI outlets are power outlets that have their own breakers built in. The purpose of a GFCI is to prevent a ground fault. When they detect even just 5mA of leakage between the hot wire and ground, the outlet will trip to protect anything plugged into the outlet. This also keeps you from getting shocked when you attempt to plug something into the outlet (which is something I’ve appreciated more than once).

GFCI outlets are required anywhere there could be water such as in kitchens, bathrooms, laundry rooms, garages, crawl spaces, unfinished basements, and outdoors. GFCI outlets can be used for any 125-volt, single-phase, 15 or 20 amp circuits.

They’re great for protecting you against electrical shock, fire, and damage to appliances, but they can be annoying if they keep tripping for seemingly no apparent reason or if the problem is difficult to find. To help solve the problem, here’s a look at the main reasons the GFCI outlets keep tripping and what to do about them.

1. An Actual Ground Fault

If the GFCI detects a ground fault leakage of 5mA it will trip. This leakage is caused by a hot wire touching the ground somewhere on the electrical line such as an appliance or even the outlet itself. This can be caused by water, wires touching, dust or debris, etc.

Worn out insulation – Insulation can become worn out or damaged over time. Especially in older wiring, insulation can dry out and crack. If there isn’t enough insulation it can cause an electrical leak where the wires are too close, which in turn trips the GFCI breaker.

Electrical wiring deterioration – Wiring can wear out over time. This is especially true of wiring that’s pinched or pulled too tight when it was installed. It can break at those stress points.

Conductive dust or debris – Accumulated dust or debris can also cause enough leakage to trip if the dust or debris is wet or conductive.

Moisture – Moisture anywhere in the line will trip the GFCI. This is the most common problem for outside outlets. Water can get into outdoor electrical boxes if they’re uncovered or if there’s an excessive amount of rain or high humidity. Moisture can also get inside the wiring of an appliance.

Make sure to protect the outlet with a hermetic or waterproof cover. If there’s water in the GFCI, trip the breaker and use a blow dryer to dry out the receptacle box. Once the outlet is completely dry, reset the GFCI.

Unplug everything from the outlet and see if the GFCI stops tripping. Plug everything back in one at a time to see which appliance is causing the breaker to trip. Check that appliance (or have it checked by a professional) for wear or damage.

You can test the leakage with a good quality leakage current tester. If you detect leakage then the appliance should be repaired.

2. An Overloaded Circuit

GFCI outlets can handle 15 or 20 amps. This is fine for the most common uses. If there are too many things plugged in and drawing too much current the breaker will trip to protect from overheating. In this case, the outlet is doing its job.

Lots of things can overload the circuit including permanently installed electric motors, fluorescent lighting, lines with lots of splices, and even electrical lines with longer than 100 feet can keep the GFCI tripping.

Another possibility is a defective appliance drawing too much current. This can be caused by bad connections or corrosion, or the appliance wearing out. In this case, the appliance needs to be repaired.

The best way to test this is to limit what’s plugged into the outlet to see if the problem goes away. If the appliance is not bad, then you might need a dedicated circuit just for that appliance in order to limit the amount of current going through the GFCI.

3. A Bad GFCI Outlet

All electrical components degrade over time and GFCI outlets are no different. They’ve been known to be good for up to 25 years, but they can fail much sooner than that. Many recommend replacing them every 10 years. Replacing the outlet requires electrical training or an electrician.

They should be tested every month by pressing the test and reset buttons. If the breaker will not reset then the GFCI outlet itself will need to be replaced. You can also test the GFCI with a ground fault receptacle tester.

Even if the GFCI outlet is good, the problem can be inside the outlet itself. For example, I’ve seen the ground wire come loose inside the outlet and touch a hot wire.

4. Something Else is Bad on the Circuit

If replacing the outlet doesn’t solve the problem there could be another outlet on the line that’s bad or something that’s plugged into them that’s bad. It could also be a bad circuit breaker.

Troubleshoot all of the outlets on the same line by unplugging everything that’s plugged into them to identify if the problem is with an appliance or outlet. You might need to test each outlet individually.

Ending Thoughts

Those are the most common causes and fixes for when a GFCI outlet keeps tripping. The problem can be external, such as water or an appliance, too many things plugged in and overloading the circuit, with the GFCI outlet itself, or something else downstream on the same electrical line.

Always be careful when testing electrical outlets. If you’re not experienced, then it’s best to hire an experienced and qualified professional.

Previous post
Next post

15 Comments

  1. Jerry Durnil

    I thought info was good without going into whole bunch of technical electrical gobble-gook (Sp ?) I thought of the pinched pulled wires but not things like damp dust causing trips.

    I am a retired chemical engineer with about 30 years experience in dealing with the government and nuclear weapons industries.

  2. ANGELA

    My bathroom outlet keeps tripping I reset it trips back out even when Nothin plugged in

    • Adam

      A GFCI tester would tell you If your ground wire is loose causing a trip, an instant trip means there’s a ground wire touching something Its not suppose to, listen to your GFCI and keep it off until you find the source of the problem, The Ground Fault circuit interrupter cuts power when it recognizes an alternate source to ground, whether that be water, Acxumukation of Dust, Age of copper wire, old ( 10+ years ) GFCI or a loose wire touching ground or ground touching a loose wire, it could also be something as simple as a gust of wind or an electronic device that’s plugged in on a outlet that’s not labeled as GFCI… The GFCI outlet should always be the first receptacle that protects all/any other receptacles outside or near water, but that dont mean one might be in a random location that’s not near a water source, more times than not a outside outlet is wired into an internal GFCI (inside), so if you have an outlet outside and Its not weather protected or new you might want to look into that.

    • Adam

      A GFCI tester would tell you If your ground wire is loose causing a trip, an instant trip means there’s a ground wire touching something Its not suppose to, listen to your GFCI and keep it off until you find the source of the problem, The Ground Fault circuit interrupter cuts power when it recognizes an alternate source to ground, whether that be water, Acxumukation of Dust, Age of copper wire, old ( 10+ years ) GFCI or a loose wire touching ground or ground touching a loose wire, it could also be something as simple as a gust of wind or an electronic device that’s plugged in on a outlet that’s not labeled as GFCI… The GFCI outlet should always be the first receptacle that protects all/any other receptacles outside or near water, but that dont mean one might be in a random location that’s not near a water source, more times than not a outside outlet is wired into an internal GFCI (inside), so if you have an outlet outside and Its not weather protected or new you might want to look into that… As a side note the GFCI is similar to an AFCI, one detects arcs from the hot or neutral wires and one detects ground faults, both trip when there’s an abnormal collection, with that being said, a ground wire is there to redirect any abnormal current so your outlets dont fry in the event of a lightning strike or large spark, so if something hit the hot wire or neutral wire with enough force that it had to redirect that current your GFCI would trip for being above the .5 – .7 range going through ground, Its the small tick tick tick that sometimes undetectable that AFCI gets, those small ticks can heat up surface areas and start fires, more times than not they’re caused by old receptacles that use the backstab method inside of wiring the wires to the screws and from inexperienced homeowners doing their own wiring without the correct equipment and certification.

  3. Gary K

    Great article. I have an older home and replaced an existing receptacle with a GFCI. Not until getting into it did I realize that the refrigerator is on the same circuit. This brand new 15 amp GFCI kept tripping so I replaced that with a 20 amp one. Still trips. No problems before, what’s up?

    • Adam

      Hello Gary K, I’m sorry for the delayed response, typically refrigerators are on a dedicated 20A circuit because of their flucuating amperage spike… With that in mind no harm comes from having the refrigerator on a 20A circuit with 5 or 6 outlets protected by a 20A GFCI, there’s only one downfall to that scenario “which can be easily fixed”, when the element in the freezer starts to wear down from age the defrost cycle will make the GFCI trip due to the water that lands on the element, because the water acts as a ground fault, so by simply replacing the element you can eliminate the fault and keep the gfci installed on the circuit… In the modern age were in I would suggest upgrading your existing 14/2 wiring to 12/2 if a new fridge is purchased… But there’s more than one option of course, I just gave you two, a third one would be to take out the GFCI and replace it with a regular outlet if of course the other outlets on the circuit aren’t near a water source.

  4. Eric Gahan

    GFI resets – but trips no matter what I plug into it.

    Trying the unplug everything and reset GFI – then plug one thing in at a time to test each. It doesn’t matter what I test – it trips it. Unplug and reset GFI again – plug something (anything) in and it pops

    • Eric Gahan

      Clarification: not the outlet itself… I mean anything plugged in or turned on that is connected to the GFCI outlet – if you plug something into the outlet itself it works fine.

      If you plug something into another outlet connected to that GFCI outlet or a light switch connected to it, etc. the GFCI trips so it seems like the underground wiring going out to the other outlet and switch might be bad -wherever that is joined to come to the GFCI — how can I easily tell and/or fix this without getting into costly digging or searching for the wiring problem?

  5. Brent

    Helpful article. Thank you. Here’s the situation that I am trying to diagnose: I have a mini-fridge in an outdoor kitchen (the fridge is not outdoor rated) which is plugged into a GFI outlet, both the fridge and outlet are enclosed and not exposed to the elements. The outlets and the fridge are ~5 years old. Last week, the GFI tripped. I reset the outlet and plugged back in, the GFI flipped again in under 48 hours. I am now testing the fridge in another GFI outlet via an extension cord to another GFI outlet on the same circuit. It’s been ~48 hours and still hasn’t flipped. I was about to go buy a new fridge, assuming that was the problem. But, now wondering if it might be the outlet or something else going on. Any suggestions on how to best diagnose the problem? Thanks!

  6. Michael Caruso

    Hi,

    All of a sudden the GFCI switch in my garage keeps tripping. It was fine late last night , and then when I went out early this afternoon, I noticed the automatic garage door lights didn’t come on. I checked the breakers and they are fine. I then remembered the GFCI outlet in the garage, and it was tripped. I reset it and it tripped again right away.

    On that circuit I have my sprinkler system control box, an AT&T box, the automatic garage door openers and a refrigerator/freezer. There has been nothing added to the circuit, and the things I mentioned above have been plugged in for 6 years with no issues. I bought the house new In 2014 so these have been on the circuit the whole time I’ve lived here. Also, every year at Christmas time, the Christmas lights for half of my house are also plugged into an outlet in the garage that’s on the circuit, increasing the load, but I have never had an issue with the GFCI switch tripping.

    The refrigerator freezer in the garage was plugged into the actual GFCI outlet. When I unplug the fridge so and reset the GFCI switch, it’s fine and doesn’t trip as long as the fridge isn’t plugged into it. I then tried plugging the fridge into another outlet in the garage that is on the circuit using an extension cord, and the GFCI switch tripped right away again. Just for giggles, I plugged my toaster into the GFCI outlet in the garage and made a toaster strudel (yum), and the GFCI switch did not trip.

    Then I tried experimenting inside. I plugged the refrigerator/freezer into a random outlet in the house using an extension cord and everything was fine. Since I have two GFCI outlets in the kitchen, I plugged the refrigerator/freezer into each of them and turned on the other appliances on those circuits and had no problems with either one.

    So given all the above, I think this tells me either that even though it’s been fine for years, something about the refrigerator/freezer is causing the issue when plugged into the circuit, or, even though the toaster worked in the GFCI outlet, maybe the GFCI outlet/switch itself is going bad.

    Can someone with some electrical experience provide your assessment/opinion on what might be the culprit? I tried to be as complete as possible.

    Thank you!

  7. steve

    i am installing 2 new gfci exterior outlets . I am feeding off a wire that supplies about 3 outlets then an outdoor light and then the first gfci which then leads into 2 interior outlets before reaching the 2nd gfci. I cannot get the first gfci to reset when i run my test but if i remove the 1st gfci and connect the wires all outlets and my second gfci work fine.

  8. Chris

    I had all the hardwired smoke detectors in my rental home go off. NO fire nor any other probable cause. Batteries all good. Decided to replace ALL of them. In the process I found two tripped GRI’s in my garage that I know hadn’t been tripped previously.
    There is a refrigerator I leave running and I know the humidity gets high in there. I normally put a large container of Damp Rid in there to help control, but it was all used up.

    My question – is it possible/probable high humidity caused the GFI’s to trip and then the hard wired smoke alarms to go off? Seems a stretch to me, but I’m looking for reasons why the smoke alarms went off and they could not be silenced until power was cutoff and the batteries removed.

  9. Terry

    Hey, I live in a mobile home with 14/2 wiring (not ideal) but pulling new wire would be super expensive. I put GFCI on all my outlets and changed out older 15amp to 20 amp and even split a few wires when adding more 20 amp circuits.
    I have one outlet that tripped before the GFCI and still trips, funny thing is it doesn’t trip all the time. Worked a lot to make sure it was put in correctly, and it was all good for about a year, then it tripped. I reset it and all good for a few months. This happened a few more times over the course of a year. Sometimes it would trip once or twice in a day, other times not for months.
    I have never plugged anything into that outlet, but the outlet past it (with a GFCI that doesn’t trip) has a laptop and flashlight in it and then runs to a switch for the porch light. I could live without using the porch light, but there is another outlet on the line before it reaches the GFCI that is tripping as well as a ceiling light.
    Questions:
    Q1 – Would there be any hazard or danger in leaving a tripped GFCI in the tripped stage and not repairing it?
    Q2- How can I trace the problem – maybe its from an outlet or light switch either before or after the GFCI that keeps tripping?
    Q3- Do you recommend flipping the circuit breaker leading to any tripped outlet until it is repaired (again I have outlets leading up to the tripping GFCI that still work, just those after the tripped outlet are obviously cut off)?

  10. Thomas

    my gfci outlet is on my inverter. I have an automatic transfer switch, and when it switches from public power to the inverter, the outlet trips. But when I reset the outlet it will work just fine. It is only on the initial switch of power that it trips. Any idea?

  11. Greta James

    I have 3 GFCI outlets in my home and every single one will trip multiple times per week. Thanks for pointing out that this might be caused by worn-out insulation on wiring. My home is 60 years old, and this is a definite possibility. I should contact a professional who can help me solve this problem and get my wiring working as it should.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Why a Microwave Keeps Tripping the Breaker - […] Try another outlet to see if the problem goes away. If it does, then the problem is with the…
  2. Best Electric Coffee Percolator Reviews 2020 [New] - Fika - […] what you would like. With any electrical appliance, even if you observe a problem using the GFCI tripping, then…
Share This